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Successful maiden launch of heavy-lift Angara from Plesetsk

Plesetsk Cosmodrome, Archangelsk Region, 23 December Today, the latest Russian launch vehicle, Angara-A5, has been successfully launched on its maiden test mission from the MoD 1st Test Cosmodrome at...

24.12.2014

Successful maiden launch of heavy-lift Angara from Plesetsk

 Plesetsk Cosmodrome, Archangelsk Region, 23 December –Today, the latest Russian launch vehicle, Angara-A5, has been successfully launched on its maiden test mission from the MoD 1st Test Cosmodrome at Plesetsk.This first Angara -A5 flight article, called Angara-A5.1L, blasted off at 08h 57min (msk).

The Angara-5.1L Integrated Launch Vehicle (ILV) consists of a three-stage Angara-5, made up of generic modules (common core boosters) and an ascent unit (AU). The AU comprises a satellite (payload) mass-size mockup, which is installed on the Breeze M upper stage booster under a payload fairing. The launch vehicle propulsion system operates on environmentally-safe fuel components, oxygen and kerosene. The lift-off mass of Angara-5.1L ILV is app. 768MT, the mockup mass is 2.04MT. 
Launch operations were  carried out by operational crews of the Aerospace Defense Forces and space industry entities.
All ground operations, the ILV launch, and mission proceeded nominally.
The orbital unit (OU), including the Breeze M and payload mockup, separated from Stage III nominally. The rest of the OU journey to the target geostationary orbit was based on the Breeze M propulsion system. The OU reached the target orbit at the predicted time, i.e. app. 9 hours from the lift-off.
The mission plan did not foresee Breeze M / payload separation. Having reached the target orbit, Breeze M made two maneuvers to divert the orbital unit to the graveyard orbit.
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Angara Space Rocket Complex
The Angara Space Rocket Complex (“Angara SRC”) is one of the priorities in Russia’s national program to develop launch systems using exclusively the domestic R&D and production potential.
Building the Angara SRC is a task of particular national importance. When the Angara SRC becomes operational, Russia will be in a position to launch all types of satellites from its own territory, thereby gaining a guaranteed independent access to outer space.
The Angara SRC state customers are the Ministry of Defense and Federal Space Agency while the chief design and development contractor is the Khrunichev Space Center.
The Angara LV family includes a range of light-, medium-, and heavy-lift launch vehicles based on generic modules. The Angara family will have the capacity to translate virtually the entire range of would-be payloads to orbits of the entire range of altitudes and inclinations including geostationary orbits, affording true independence to domestic space programs. The modular principle supports the buildup of various launch vehicle classes by just using so many generic boosters: one for the light-lift, three for the medium-lift and five for the heavy-lift.
The generic modules (Common Core Boosters) serve as basis for building light-, medium-, and heavy-lift launch vehicles. Standardization and commonality of the parts being used, combined with unique design solutions, make it possible to launch all LVs of the Angara family from one multi-purpose launch pad.
Generic modules (common core boosters - CCBs) had been flight-tested as part of the experimental small-lift Angara-1.2ML, which was successfully launched in July 2014, starting Angara SRC flight tests out of Plesetsk.
Also, a prototype of Angara - 1.2ML Stage I, the URM-1 CCB, had been flight-tested as part of KSLV, the first-ever South Korean launch vehicle, which launched on three occasions: in 2009, 2010, and 2013.
24.12.2014

From Baikonur: Proton Launch #400

Today, at 03h16m (msk), a Proton M integrated launch vehicle blasted off from a Baikonur launch pad to inject the Russian Yamal-401 spacecraft.

15.12.2014

From Baikonur: Proton Launch #400

Today, at 03h16m (msk), a Proton M integrated launch vehicle blasted off from a Baikonur launch pad to inject the Russian Yamal-401 spacecraft. At the design time, the orbital unit including the Breeze M upper stage booster and the Yamal-401 spacecraft separated nominally from the LV Stage III, and continued the mission in a standalone mode. Subsequently, the spacecraft injection to the target orbit is performed based on four burns of the Breeze M main engine. The spacecraft/Breeze M separation is expected 9 hours 1 minute after the LV blastoff.

This jubilee Launch #400 is another milestone in the flight history of multiple Proton launch vehicle (LV) modifications which started on 16th July, 1965. It also is a Proton Launch #7 in 2014.

The heavy-lift Proton launch vehicle and the Breeze M upper stage booster were designed, and are series-produced, by the FGUP “Khrunichev State-Owned Research & Production Space Center”.
Yamal-401 was built on orders of Gazprom Space Systems (http://www.gascom.ru/) by ISS Reshetnev Company. The payload components and platform were supplied by Thales Alenia Space (France). The Yamal-401 spacecraft will provide non-stop retransmission of communications and broadcasting traffic over Europe and Asia.
The contract for a Proton launch of Yamal-401 was signed by the RF-US company, International Launch Services Inc. (ILS).www.ilslaunch.com).
15.12.2014